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Sunday, November 1, 2015

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs
by Mignon Fogarty (http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/transitive-and-intransitive-verbs)
It helps to know the difference between transitive and intransitive verbs, but the names are hard to remember. Here's the trick I use.

transitive and intransitive verbs
Transitive VerbsTransitive verbs require an object. For example, filled is a transitive verb and the cup is the object in the sentence She filled the cup. It doesn't make much sense to have filled without an object. She filled is incomplete.
The tip for remembering the name is to think of transitive verbs as transferring their action to the object. Transitive and transfer both start with the prefix trans-.
Examples of Transitive Verbs
Here are some examples of transitive verbs:
They designated a hitter.
The clock struck one.want candy.He carried the bag.Jose thanked Wayne.
Examples of Intransitive Verbs
Intransitive verbs don't take an object. Here are some examples of intransitive verbs:
He ran.They napped.The dog barked.Blair gloated.Clarissa winked.
Examples of Verbs That Can Be Transitive and Intransitive
Some verbs can be transitive or intransitive, depending on how they are used in a sentence. To cheer is one example.
They cheered.They cheered the band.
She sang.She sang a song.
Larry tripped.Larry tripped Alex.
We visited.We visited Aunt Ruth.

Stative and Dynamic Verbs

Dynamic Verbs versus Stative Verbs

For progressive tenses, English is divided into two groups of verbs: Dynamic and Stative.  

Dynamic verbs relate an action or a process. Common dynamic verbs are “to walk,” “to yell,” and “to read.” These verbs can be conjugated in progressive tenses, so it’s fine to say, “I will be walking all day” and “He was yelling at me.”

Stative verbs describe a state of being and are not supposed to be conjugated in progressive tenses. 
The About.com ESL site helpfully breaks stative verbs into four groups (1): 
  • Verbs that show thought or opinion, such as “know” and “recognize” (I know her motives.)
  • Verbs that show possession, such as “own” and “belong” (The dog belongs to me.)
  • Verbs that show emotion, such as “love” and “need” (I love Squiggly) 
  • Verbs that show senses, such as “feel” and “see” (I see what you mean). 
That last group is especially tricky because many of them can be stative or dynamic verbs depending on how you use them.

According to this division of verbs, you’re not allowed to say sentences such as “They are owning three cars” and “I am seeing the portrait.” Any native speaker will innately sense that those two sentences sound odd.

Also some verbs can be both dynamic and stative. For example, the verb “to be.” You can use "to be" in a progressive tense to mean “to behave,” as in “You are being naughty.” In this case, “to be” is being used as a dynamic verb. On the other hand, if you say, “She is a brunette,” “to be” is being used as a stative verb. You couldn’t say, “She is being a brunette.” 

Here's another example with the verb "think." You can say, “I think you’re cute,” which is stative, and “I’m thinking about going on vacation,” which is dynamic. 

But, there are idiomatic uses of stative verbs. You can conjugate certain stative verbs in a progressive tense in the right context. I can easily imagine one lady saying to another, “Hey, Jean. I’m loving that new haircut!” On the other hand, it wouldn’t sound right to say, “I’m loving my mother.” You’d say, “I love my mother.” Another example might be the verb “to hear.” This is considered a stative verb, yet native speakers will be familiar with the statement “I’m hearin’ ya” to mean “I understand your point of view.” However, no native speaker would say, “I’m hearing the concert.”


DYNAMIC VERBS
Activity Verbs
I am begging you. I was learning French. They will be playing upstairs..
Virtually identical in meaning to simple tense forms:
I beg you. I learned French. They will play upstairs.
abandon
ask
beg
call
drink
eat
help
learn
listen
look at
play
rain
read
say
slice
throw
whisper
work
write
Process Verbs
The corn is growing rapidly. Traffic is slowing down.
Virtually identical in meaning to simple present tense forms:
The corn grows rapidly. Traffic slows down.
change
deteriorate
grow
mature
slow downwiden
Verbs of Bodily Sensation
"I feel bad" and "I am feeling bad" are virtually identical in meaning.
achefeelhurtitch
Transitional Events Verbs
Progressive forms indicate the beginning of an event,
as opposed to the simple present tense.
"She was falling out of bed [when I caught her]" as opposed to
"She falls out of bed every night."
arrive
die
fall
land
leavelose
Momentary Verbs
Progressive forms indicate little duration and suggest repetition.
She is hitting her brother.
He is jumping around the house.
hit
jump
kick
knock
nodtap

STATIVE VERBS
Verbs of Inert Perception and Cognition*
I detest rutabaga, but not I am detesting rutabaga.
I prefer cinnamon toast, but not I am preferring cinnamon toast.
abhor
adore
astonish
believe
desire
detest
dislike
doubt
feel
forgive
guess
hate
hear
imagine
impress
intend
know
like
love
mean
mind
perceive
please
prefer
presuppose
realize
recall
recognize
regard
remember
satisfy
see
smell
suppose
taste
think
understand
want
wish
Relational Verbs
I am sick, but not I am being sick.
I own ten acres of land, but not I am owning ten acres.
My brother owes me ten dollars" but not
My brother is owing me ten dollars.
be*
belong to
concern
consist of
contain
cost
depend on
deserve
equal
fit
have
include
involve
lack
matter
need
owe
own
possess
require
require
resemble
seem
sound
http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/progressive.htm

Practice Quiz for Stative and Dynamic Verbs
http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/410/grammar/stat1.htm



Sunday, October 18, 2015

Action Verbs for Learning Objectives

At the end are some action verbs for your lesson plans:

1st - Create a stem - After completing the less, the student will be able to....
After this unit, the student will have .....
By completing the activities, the student will .....
At the conclusion of the course/unit/study the student will .....

2nd - Add the verb

3rd - Determine the actual product

Sample:: After completing the lesson, the student will be able to listen for the purpose of following directions.

After completing the lesson, the student will be able to explain the meaning of the words ...

After completing the lesson, the student will be able to summarize the plot of ....

********************************************

Action Verbs:
abstract, activate, acquire, adjust, analyze, appraise, arrange, articulate, assemble, assess, assist, associate
breakdown, build
calculate, carry out, catalog, categorize, change, check, cite, classify, collect, combine, compare, compute, contrast, complete, compose, compute, conduct, construct, convert, coordinate, count, criticize, critique
debate, decrease, define, demonstrate, describe, design, detect, develop, differentiate, direct, discuss, discover, distinguish, draw, dramatize
employ, establish, estimate, evaluate, examine, explain, explore, express, extrapolate
formulate
generalize
itentify, illustrate, implement, improve, increase, infer, integrate, interpret, introduce, investigate
judge
limit, list, locate
maintain, manage, modify
name
observe, operate, order, organize
perform, plan, point, predict, prepare, prescribe, produce, propose
question
rank, rate, read, recall, recommend, recognize, reconstruct, record, recruit, reduce, reflect, relate, remove, reorganize, repair, repeat, replace, report, reproduce, research, restate, restructure, revise, rewrite
schedule, score, select, separate, sequence, sing, sketch, simplify, skim, solve, specify, state, structure, summarize, supervise, survey, systematize
tabulate, test, theorize, trace, track, train, transfer, translate
update, use, utilize
verbalize, verify, visualize
write

List from Education Oasis

Sunday, June 28, 2015

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Saturday, January 17, 2015

Songs for teaching English

Looking for songs to reach your students?  Take a look at these websites with great songs, videos, and music - lyrics are there for you and your students to learn and use in class.

Hello song and others
http://www.supersimplesongs.com/cd2-2.html


Clap your hands - activity song
http://bussongs.com/songs/clap_your_hands.php

Teaching Kids Website

Great website for teaching kids
http://www.esl-kids.com/

Using newspapers in the ESL classroom

Free Video Quizzes

ESL video quizzes created by ESL teachers for ESL students.

Check out the link below:

Free Books!!

At this website you can get over 46,000 free e-books.  Read their page info below and then click on the link to read your choice of books!  No overweight shipping on these books!

Project Gutenberg offers over 46,000 free ebooks: choose among free epub books, free kindle books, download them or read them online.
We carry high quality ebooks: All our ebooks were previously published by bona fidepublishers. We digitized and diligently proofread them with the help of thousands of volunteers.
No fee or registration is required, but if you find Project Gutenberg useful, we kindly ask you to donate a small amount.
http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page

Tim's Free English Lesson Plans Blog Link

This blogger has some great lesson plan ideas.  Sign up for his blog and receive new plans and updates in your email.

Link: http://freeenglishlessonplans.com

Create your own flash cards for your students!

Follow this link to a site where you can create your own flash cards to aid in teaching or studying.

http://quizlet.com