Sunday, May 20, 2018

 This website is a great website with many free resources.

Take a look at the author's write up below

ereadingworksheets.com

Ereading Worksheets provides teachers, parents, and motivated students with high-quality reading worksheets, activities, and resources aligned with Common Core State Standards. This website uses a skill focused approach where each activity targets a specific skill set, but you can also browse the reading worksheets by grade level.
The resources on this website cover a broad range of reading, writing, and language arts skills. And this site has a growing collection of online reading activities. Everything on here is free for home and classroom use. I am committed to expanding and improving the content on this site and making it easy to access for learners around the world. Subscribe now to receive emails about new content and big updates to this site. 


Saturday, January 20, 2018

Teach English through Skype

You can teach from home via Skype through organizations such as VIPKid.

Here is a YouTube video from someone I know.

VIPKid Teacher Susie

This is a paid teaching position.

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Story Writing Prompts

Lots of story writing prompts for free:

Scholastic Story Starters:  http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/story-starters/

The Story Starter, Jr.
...now provides 194,480 story starters for kids.



Saturday, February 11, 2017

Presentation Rubric

A very simple presentation rubric

Mini Presentation
















Topic Choice - engaging and suitable for group 3 2 1
Volume & Confidence - spoke clearly; able to be heard easily; confident  5 4 3 2 1
Interest to peers - peers benefitted from presentation; interest was held; peers fully participated 5 4 3 2 1
Able to explain it well & demonstrate how to do it 5 4 3 2 1
Lead discussion in adapting topic - come up with other adaptations and explain how to adapt it to other ages or levels 5 4 3 2 1

English Accent Coach - free pronunciation coach and guide


English Accent Coach is a great tool to improve your pronunciation.  It is free on a desktop, and only a few dollars for an iPhone app.








Sunday, February 5, 2017

Business English Links



ESLFLOW.COM - has many categories - as well as Business English

http://www.eslflow.com/BusinessEnglish.html



British Council - English for Business - also has great business English categories

https://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/teaching-adults/resources/english-business



ESL Right Now has links to Business English lesson plans

https://eslrightnow.com/business-english-lesson-plans/ 

Saturday, February 4, 2017

Volunteer Opportunities

Go through this list and you are sure to find some volunteer teaching opportunities -


https://niagara.cioc.ca/volunteer/



Friday, May 27, 2016

Volunteer Locally

Do you need some volunteer teaching hours to spruce up your resume?

Take a look at the following links to get some ideas.

Niagara Regional Literacy Council
Niagara Regional Literacy Council, founded in 1978, is a community based, not-for-profit, organization dedicated to literacy.  Our trained volunteer tutors assist adults with reading, writing, numeracy, workplace, computer and life skills. 

ESL Classes for Migrant Farm Workers
Youtube Video 
Email Address: manifestyourvoice@gmail.com

Volunteer in China - while staying at home!

Do you have little to no teaching experience?  Then it's time to volunteer until the right opportunity opens up.

Here is one opportunity to be a Skype teacher/tutor for children in Sichuan, China!

Volunteer in China through Skype




Sunday, November 1, 2015

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs
by Mignon Fogarty (http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/transitive-and-intransitive-verbs)
It helps to know the difference between transitive and intransitive verbs, but the names are hard to remember. Here's the trick I use.

transitive and intransitive verbs
Transitive VerbsTransitive verbs require an object. For example, filled is a transitive verb and the cup is the object in the sentence She filled the cup. It doesn't make much sense to have filled without an object. She filled is incomplete.
The tip for remembering the name is to think of transitive verbs as transferring their action to the object. Transitive and transfer both start with the prefix trans-.
Examples of Transitive Verbs
Here are some examples of transitive verbs:
They designated a hitter.
The clock struck one.want candy.He carried the bag.Jose thanked Wayne.
Examples of Intransitive Verbs
Intransitive verbs don't take an object. Here are some examples of intransitive verbs:
He ran.They napped.The dog barked.Blair gloated.Clarissa winked.
Examples of Verbs That Can Be Transitive and Intransitive
Some verbs can be transitive or intransitive, depending on how they are used in a sentence. To cheer is one example.
They cheered.They cheered the band.
She sang.She sang a song.
Larry tripped.Larry tripped Alex.
We visited.We visited Aunt Ruth.

Stative and Dynamic Verbs

Dynamic Verbs versus Stative Verbs

For progressive tenses, English is divided into two groups of verbs: Dynamic and Stative.  

Dynamic verbs relate an action or a process. Common dynamic verbs are “to walk,” “to yell,” and “to read.” These verbs can be conjugated in progressive tenses, so it’s fine to say, “I will be walking all day” and “He was yelling at me.”

Stative verbs describe a state of being and are not supposed to be conjugated in progressive tenses. 
The About.com ESL site helpfully breaks stative verbs into four groups (1): 
  • Verbs that show thought or opinion, such as “know” and “recognize” (I know her motives.)
  • Verbs that show possession, such as “own” and “belong” (The dog belongs to me.)
  • Verbs that show emotion, such as “love” and “need” (I love Squiggly) 
  • Verbs that show senses, such as “feel” and “see” (I see what you mean). 
That last group is especially tricky because many of them can be stative or dynamic verbs depending on how you use them.

According to this division of verbs, you’re not allowed to say sentences such as “They are owning three cars” and “I am seeing the portrait.” Any native speaker will innately sense that those two sentences sound odd.

Also some verbs can be both dynamic and stative. For example, the verb “to be.” You can use "to be" in a progressive tense to mean “to behave,” as in “You are being naughty.” In this case, “to be” is being used as a dynamic verb. On the other hand, if you say, “She is a brunette,” “to be” is being used as a stative verb. You couldn’t say, “She is being a brunette.” 

Here's another example with the verb "think." You can say, “I think you’re cute,” which is stative, and “I’m thinking about going on vacation,” which is dynamic. 

But, there are idiomatic uses of stative verbs. You can conjugate certain stative verbs in a progressive tense in the right context. I can easily imagine one lady saying to another, “Hey, Jean. I’m loving that new haircut!” On the other hand, it wouldn’t sound right to say, “I’m loving my mother.” You’d say, “I love my mother.” Another example might be the verb “to hear.” This is considered a stative verb, yet native speakers will be familiar with the statement “I’m hearin’ ya” to mean “I understand your point of view.” However, no native speaker would say, “I’m hearing the concert.”


DYNAMIC VERBS
Activity Verbs
I am begging you. I was learning French. They will be playing upstairs..
Virtually identical in meaning to simple tense forms:
I beg you. I learned French. They will play upstairs.
abandon
ask
beg
call
drink
eat
help
learn
listen
look at
play
rain
read
say
slice
throw
whisper
work
write
Process Verbs
The corn is growing rapidly. Traffic is slowing down.
Virtually identical in meaning to simple present tense forms:
The corn grows rapidly. Traffic slows down.
change
deteriorate
grow
mature
slow downwiden
Verbs of Bodily Sensation
"I feel bad" and "I am feeling bad" are virtually identical in meaning.
achefeelhurtitch
Transitional Events Verbs
Progressive forms indicate the beginning of an event,
as opposed to the simple present tense.
"She was falling out of bed [when I caught her]" as opposed to
"She falls out of bed every night."
arrive
die
fall
land
leavelose
Momentary Verbs
Progressive forms indicate little duration and suggest repetition.
She is hitting her brother.
He is jumping around the house.
hit
jump
kick
knock
nodtap

STATIVE VERBS
Verbs of Inert Perception and Cognition*
I detest rutabaga, but not I am detesting rutabaga.
I prefer cinnamon toast, but not I am preferring cinnamon toast.
abhor
adore
astonish
believe
desire
detest
dislike
doubt
feel
forgive
guess
hate
hear
imagine
impress
intend
know
like
love
mean
mind
perceive
please
prefer
presuppose
realize
recall
recognize
regard
remember
satisfy
see
smell
suppose
taste
think
understand
want
wish
Relational Verbs
I am sick, but not I am being sick.
I own ten acres of land, but not I am owning ten acres.
My brother owes me ten dollars" but not
My brother is owing me ten dollars.
be*
belong to
concern
consist of
contain
cost
depend on
deserve
equal
fit
have
include
involve
lack
matter
need
owe
own
possess
require
require
resemble
seem
sound
http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/progressive.htm

Practice Quiz for Stative and Dynamic Verbs
http://web2.uvcs.uvic.ca/elc/studyzone/410/grammar/stat1.htm